Building a Better Behind

Whether it’s too big, small, flat, or flabby, most people would love to improve the shape of their butt.  Although genetics and body type play a role, strengthening the muscles, along with decreasing the subcutaneous fat surrounding the glutes, are essential to sculpting and firming up that behind.

The anatomy of the glutes consists of three main muscles: the gluteus maximus (the largest and most visible), along with the gluteus medius and gluteus minimus, which are found underneath.  These muscles extend and laterally rotate the hip as well as extend the trunk.  These muscles are activated with several movements including standing, jumping, squatting, lunging, and deadlifting.  To maximize fat loss and lean muscle gain for your glute development, it is essential to combine effective strength movements, such as some of the exercises described above, with cardiovascular training.  Click here to learn how to maximize your cardio session.

Beyond the aesthetic benefit, training these gluteal muscles minimizes the risk of injury associated with glute weakness such as knee pain, lower back issues, and pulled hamstrings.  Having strong glutes allows anyone from the fitness enthusiast to the elite athlete to run faster and more efficiently, jump higher and farther, rotate and change direction quicker, and lift heavier weight.

Effective strengthening exercises range from more isolated movements such as the hip bridge, quadruped hip extension, and hip flexor stretch to more advanced squats, lunges, rear foot elevated split squats, step-ups, and deadlifts.  It’s important to activate and target the glutes for optimal performance on and off the playing field, as well as to look great in those new pair of jeans.

Proper form and range of motion are essential for maximal benefit with minimal risk for injury when performing these movements.  Find out how to achieve this and to learn additional exercises by contacting Dan at (978) 807-8579 or visit seachangefitness.net.

Advertisements

About Sea Change Fitness & Nutrition

Exercise Physiologist Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist Certified Nutrition Specialist

Posted on November 9, 2011, in Dan's Blog and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: